Film music

‘Khada Hai’, the song that will always haunt Pahlaj Nihalani

The sexually loaded song appeared in the 1994 film ‘Andaz’, produced by the censor board chairperson.

Ever since Pahlaj Nihalani took over the Central Board of Film Certification in 2015, his past transgressions as a producer have been gleefully resurrected by his critics. One of the most memorable among them is the song Khada Hai from Andaz (1994), among the many films Nihalani produced in the 1980s and ’90s. Nihalani allegedly recalled the song and its reputation and cited it a cause for wanting director Kushal Nandy to get rid of the word “khada” from his film Babumoshai Bandookbaaz.

Directed by David Dhawan, Andaz stars Anil Kapoor as Ajay Kumar, a mild-mannered school teacher who can fight the bad guys if need be. The principal’s daughter Jaya (Karisma Kapoor) is infatuated with Ajay, but it is against his morals to have an affair with her. Instead, he marries orphan Saraswati (Juhi Chawla), who is too much of a sanskari simpleton to please Ajay in all the ways he would like.

One night, after being denied sex by Saraswati, Ajay sleeps outside the house but starts to feel the pangs of pleasure. He shouts “Snake!” and a concerned Saraswati walks out. Ajay drums on her waist with his fingers, Saraswati makes a face, and Khada Hai (“It is standing”) begins.

As Ajay declares “Khada hai, khada hai”, Jaya hugs her pillow hard and shivers. Throughout the song, Ajay wants to enter the house, while Saraswati keeps the doors closed (“Dar pe tere aashiq khada hai, khol khol khol darwaza khol.”) The lyrics are by Indeevar.

The song-and-dance routine is later joined by the neighbours, who are shooed away by Saraswati with a broom. Ajay’s after-hour aerobatics are in vain. Saraswati does not relent, and the night is saved without any “humping scenes”.

Play
Khada Hai.
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