Shooting film songs

Picture the song: Lovers burn up the phone wires in ‘Jalte Hai Jiske Liye’

The song from Bimal Roy’s 1959 classic ‘Sujata’ is one of the most quietly raging love songs out there.

Sujata is an orphaned Dalit girl brought up by a Brahmin couple with a daughter of their own. Her earliest lesson in long-distance affection comes soon after she has been given shelter by the kind-hearted Upendra (Tarun Bose) and Charu (Sulochana) as a baby. Charu (Sulochana) sings a lullaby to her daughter Rama – the lovely Nanhi Kali Sone Chali – as Sujata cries in the servants’ quarter. Charu isn’t broad-minded enough to take Sujata in her arms, but she comes to the window and continues the song. Its gentle notes carry over to the infant and lull her to sleep.

Sujata (Nutan) is rudely reminded of her position in the caste hierarchy after she has become an adult. The handsome and sensitive Adhir (Sunil Dutt) has fallen for her, but he misunderstands her reticence as an inferiority complex over being adopted. He also doesn’t know that he is supposed to marry Rama (Shashikala). After promising her heart to Adhir, Sujata learns both about the proposed match and plans to marry her off to the first available groom. Then the phone rings.

Bimal Roy’s quietly profound films, including Do Bigha Zamin (1953), Madhumati (1958), Sujata (1959) and Bandini (1963), explored Indian social realities with curiosity, complexity and immense delicacy. A forerunner of Indian neo-realist cinema, Roy created richly textured social dramas in the 1950s and ’60s that wove together romance, humour, tragedy and thought-provoking themes. He found apt situations for songs in his films and ensured that they fit snugly into the narrative.

Sujata has several SD Burman classics that complement the emotional states of the characters. Jalte Hai Jiske Liye, sung by Talat Mehmood, is the song with which Adhir serenades Sujata over the telephone. It’s vintage Bimal Roy: the camera movements and editing cuts are minimal, like the song itself; there are close-ups; the plot moves forward. Sujata is in agony as Adhir mouths Majrooh Sultanpuri’s lyrics in Mehmood’s tremulous voice. He is full of ardour, while she crumples her sari and silently weeps into the phone. Roy rhythmically cuts between the characters and resists any attempts to ruin the moment with flourishes. The rage is all in the lyrics. Adhir tells Sujata that his song is as delicate as glass and must be handled with care – just like Roy treated the sensitive subject of caste discrimination way back in 1959.

Play
Jalte Hai Jiske Liye from Sujata (1959).
We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
Sponsored Content BY 

A phone so stunning that it deserves its own photoshoot

Presenting the Moto X4, crafted to perfection.

Precision-crafted glass and metal design, an anodised aluminium frame, easy to hold and featuring beautiful contours, the Moto X4 is crafted to perfection indeed.

With the distinctive placement of the rear cameras, this phone makes a great subject for a photographic series.

Gaurav Sawn Photography
Gaurav Sawn Photography

The light reveals the fluidity of its body; curves that fit perfectly in the contours of a palm.

Gaurav Sawn Photography
Gaurav Sawn Photography

Reclining on a bed of satin, the glass-encased phone blends into the folds of the luxurious fabric.

The slimness, seamlessness and solidity of the phone make for a great profile shot.

A stunning design which is IP68 rated water-resistant too, it is as beautiful as it is strong.

We partnered with photographer Gaurav Sawn to create this series. Says Gaurav, “The glass sandwich design looks extremely good and the reflections on the back panel make the phone stand out. This is a phone that is best used without a case. The curved corners were also very comfortable to hold. All in all, really enjoyed shooting this phone!”

While this phone is elegant and crafted to perfection, it is also extremely tough, being protected from scratches with Corning® Gorilla® Glass that stretches all the way around.

You don’t need to sacrifice of performance either. It’s packed with a 2.2 GHz octa-core Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 630 processor and comes with a TurboPower™ Charger which means hours of power in minutes!

For the music lover, this phone is a boon. With simultaneous connectivity of up to four Bluetooth® audio devices at the same time, you can build your own stereo system without worrying about cables.

The dual rear cameras – a 12MP that lets you focus faster and get great results even on dark, cloudy days, and an 8 MP camera, with wide angle lens makes your most ambitious photos look all the more impressive.

To get your hands on the Moto X4, and experience perfection, click here.

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of Motorola and not by the Scroll editorial team.