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Is Arijit Singh the singer at odds with Arijit Singh the star?

In his latest tantrum, the successful singer claims that his career has peaked.

Has popular playback singer Arijit Singh developed a foot-in-mouth syndrome or he is merely being a divo?

In a recent interview, the 29-year-old crooner declared that his tribe had a limited shelf life in film music, not exceeding six years. “I don’t think I have a long way to go. This might be my last year,” Singh said about his own career.

Singh’s statement sounds far-fetched, but don’t be surprised if he makes good his threat. The temperamental singer has been courting headlines throughout 2016 with his public outbursts. In May, Singh wrote an apology letter on his Facebook profile to Salman Khan, requesting the actor to retain his version of the song Jug Ghoomeya in the sports drama Sultan. Khan dismissed the apology, but that did not dampen Singh’s spirits.

In October, Singh lambasted music composer Abhijit Vaghani for tweaking his voice beyond recognition in a cover version of the classic tune Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail, 1973) for the upcoming crime thriller Wajah Tum Ho (2016).

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‘Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas’.

It is clear from Singh’s online posts that he wants to control his public image. First comes the outburst that invites multiple interpretations, after which the singer selectively communicates with the media to offer his clarifications.

The singer’s transformation has been building up over time. He was briefly arrested in 2013 for allegedly assaulting a news cameraman who had the temerity to approach the singer as he emerged from a court in Behrampore, where divorce proceedings from his first wife were being heard. Singh hit the cameraman with a helmet. Singh remarried in 2014, updating fans through a photograph posted on social media.

Despite his erratic behaviour, the gifted singer is at the top of his game. His big break came with the melodic Phir Mohabbat (Murder 2, 2011), composed by Mithoon. He has delivered several chartbusters since then and picked up two Filmfare Best Male Playback trophies for Tum Hi Ho (Aashiqui 2, 2013) and Sooraj Dooba Hai (Roy, 2015).

In 2016 alone, Singh has notched up credits in over 30 films. The mushy sounds of Soch Na Sake (Airlift) filled the January chill with lilt and December will waltz by with Nashe Si Chadh Gayi (Befikre). In between, his soulful rendition of the title track of Ae Dil Hai Mushkil is likely to win several trophies. There hasn’t been a month without his songs featuring at the top of the charts – unless, of course, Singh drop the mike as threatened.

What else could Arijit Singh do if not sing? He wants to be a film director, and has even helmed the Bengali production Bhalobasar Rojnamcha. But the film remains unreleased.

In his rare interactions with the media, Singh has always maintained that he likes to keep a low public profile. His repeated tantrums are giving the once-benign talent a reputation for being moody, sulky and irritable, but never boring. Arijit Singh is not only a singer, but well on his way to being declared a bona fide rock star.

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‘Nashe Si Chadh Gayi’.
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The quirks and perks of travelling with your hard to impress mom

We must admit that the jar of pickle always comes in handy.

A year ago, Priyanka, a 26-year-old banking professional, was packing her light-weight duffel bag for an upcoming international trip. Keen to explore the place, she wanted to travel light and fuss free. It was not meant to be. For Priyanka was travelling with her mother, and that meant carrying at least two extra suitcases packed with odds and ends for any eventuality just short of a nuclear war.

Bothered by the extra suitcases that she had to lug around full of snacks and back-up woollens, Priyanka grew frustrated with her mother. However, one day, while out for some sight-seeing Priyanka and her family were famished but there were no decent restaurants in sight. That’s when her mum’s ‘food bag’ came to the rescue. Full of juice boxes, biscuits and sandwiches, her mother had remembered to pack snacks from the hotel for their day out. Towards the end of the trip, Priyanka was grateful to her mother for all her arrangements, especially the extra bag she carried for Priyanka’s shopping.

Priyanka’s story isn’t an isolated one. We spoke to many people about their mother’s travel quirks and habits and weren’t surprised at some of the themes that were consistent across all the travel memoirs.

Indian mothers are always prepared

“My mom keeps the packed suitcases in the hallway one day before our flight date. She will carry multiple print-outs of the flight tickets because she doesn’t trust smartphone batteries. She also never forgets to carry a medical kit for all sorts of illnesses and allergies”, says Shruti, a 27-year-old professional. When asked if the medical kit was helpful during the trip, she answered “All the time”, in a tone that marvelled at her mother’s clairvoyance.

Some of the many things a mother packs in her travel bags. Source: Google Images
Some of the many things a mother packs in her travel bags. Source: Google Images

Indian mothers love to feel at home, and create the same experience for their family, wherever they are

“My mother has a very strange idea of the kind of food you get in foreign lands, so she always packs multiple packets of khakra and poha for our trips. She also has a habit of carrying her favourite teabags to last the entire trip”, relates Kanchan, a marketing professional who is a frequent international flier often accompanied by her mother. Kanchan’s mother, who is very choosy about her tea, was therefore delighted when she was served a hot cup of garam chai on her recent flight to Frankfurt. She is just like many Indian mothers who love to be reminded of home wherever they are and often strive to organise their hotel rooms to give them the coziness of a home.

Most importantly, Indian mothers are tough, especially when it comes to food

Take for instance, the case of Piyush, who recalls, “We went to this fine dining restaurant and my mother kept quizzing the waiter about the ingredients and the method of preparation of a dish. She believed that once she understood the technique, she would be able to make a better version of the dish just so she could pamper me!”

Indian mothers are extremely particular about food – from the way its cooked, to the way it smells and tastes. Foreign delicacies are only allowed to be consumed if they fulfil all the criteria set by Mom i.e. is it good enough for my children to consume?

An approval from an Indian mother is a testament to great quality and great taste. In recognition of the discerning nature of an Indian mum and as a part of their ‘More Indian Than You Think’ commitment, Lufthansa has tailored their in-flight experiences to surpass even her exacting standards. Greeted with a namaste and served by an Indian crew, the passengers feel right at home as they relish the authentic Indian meals and unwind with a cup of garam chai, the perfect accompaniment to go with a variety of Indian entertainment available in the flight. As Lufthansa’s in-flight offerings show, a big part of the brand is inherently Indian because of its relationship with the country spanning over decades.

To see how Lufthansa has internalised the Indian spirit and become the airline of choice for flyers looking for a great Indian experience, watch the video below.

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This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of Lufthansa as part of their More Indian Than You Think initiative and not by the Scroll editorial team.