animal planet

And the Cannes Palm Dog goes to Nellie from ‘Paterson’

The bulldog was the frontrunner at this irreverent awards ceremony at the Cannes Film Festival.

The Cannes Film Festival has room for all kinds of movies about all kinds of humans – as well as our four-legged best friends. The Palm Dog Award has been recognising the “best performance by a canine (live or animated) or group of canines” since 2001. This year’s winner is Nellie, the bulldog from Paterson. Jim Jarmusch’s drama about a bus driver and a poet was screened in the Competition section, and Nellie was a clear frontrunner for the award. The bulldog, who died a few months ago, is the first posthumous recipient of the prize, which is a collar.

Set up by British journalist Toby Rose, the Palm Dog ceremony is one of the lighter sidebar events at the festival. The event inspires puns that would not be permitted for the rest of the Cannes coverage. The Telegraph calls the event cinema’s “Nouvelle Wag”, which an AFP report announcing the prize this year declared that “...the audience was sad to learn that Nellie was no longer around and a body double Bulldog was brought in to soothe the pup-arazzi.”

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A clip from ‘Paterson’.

Here is a look at five other woof-worthy winners from previous years.

Bruno in ‘Triplets of Bellville’ One of the most charming animated dogs out there, Bruno beats all the tail-wagging and overly cute anthropomorphised beasts from the Disney kennel. For one thing, he can barely lift his enormous belly off the ground. But he does dream, Bruno does.

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‘Triplets of Belleville’.

Zochor from ‘The Cave of the Yellow Dog’ It’s hard to decide who is cuter in this Mongolian movie from 2005 – the rosy-cheeked girl from a livestock rearing family or the stray dog that she adopts.

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‘The Cave of the Yellow Dog’.

The strays from ‘Mid Road Gang’ This Thai comedy proves that redevelopment projects in cities affect animals too. Forced off their turf by a mall, a group of stray dogs seeks a better life. The pooches attempt to cross a busy highway to the other side where a “dogtopia” awaits them.

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‘Mid Road Gang’.

Lucy in ‘Wendy and Lucy’ A woman attempts to make new beginnings in Alaska along with her dog, the mixed-breed and loyal Lucy. When Lucy gets lost, Wendy changes her course. You would too.

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‘Wendy and Lucy’.

The cast of ‘White God’ Kornel Mundcruzo’s acclaimed Hungarian movie also won the top prize in the Un Certain Regard section at Cannes in 2014. The allegorical tale follows a 13-year-old girl whose father turns out her beloved pet dog Hagen, which then becomes part of a feral pack that takes over the city. The sequence in which 200 trained dogs rampage through the empty streets of Budapest is easily one of the most scintillating uses ever of canines in cinema.

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‘White Dog.
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Advice from an ex-robber on how to keep your home safe

Tips on a more hands-on approach of keeping your house secure.

Home, a space that is entirely ours, holds together our entire world. Where our children grow-up, parents grow old and we collect a lifetime of memories, home is a feeling as much as it’s a place. So, what do you do when your home is eyed by miscreants who prowl the neighbourhood night and day, plotting to break in? Here are a few pre-emptive measures you can take to make your home safe from burglars:

1. Get inside the mind of a burglar

Before I break the lock of a home, first I bolt the doors of the neighbouring homes. So that, even if someone hears some noise, they can’t come to help.

— Som Pashar, committed nearly 100 robberies.

Burglars study the neighbourhood to keep a check on the ins and outs of residents and target homes that can be easily accessed. Understanding how the mind of a burglar works might give insights that can be used to ward off such danger. For instance, burglars judge a house by its front doors. A house with a sturdy door, secured by an alarm system or an intimidating lock, doesn’t end up on the burglar’s target list. Upgrade the locks on your doors to the latest technology to leave a strong impression.

Here are the videos of 3 reformed robbers talking about their modus operandi and what discouraged them from robbing a house, to give you some ideas on reinforcing your home.

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2. Survey your house from inside out to scout out weaknesses

Whether it’s a dodgy back door, a misaligned window in your parent’s room or the easily accessible balcony of your kid’s room, identify signs of weakness in your home and fix them. Any sign of neglect can give burglars the idea that the house can be easily robbed because of lax internal security.

3. Think like Kevin McCallister from Home Alone

You don’t need to plant intricate booby traps like the ones in the Home Alone movies, but try to stay one step ahead of thieves. Keep your car keys on your bed-stand in the night so that you can activate the car alarm in case of unwanted visitors. When out on a vacation, convince the burglars that the house is not empty by using smart light bulbs that can be remotely controlled and switched on at night. Make sure that your newspapers don’t pile up in front of the main-door (a clear indication that the house is empty).

4. Protect your home from the outside

Collaborate with your neighbours to increase the lighting around your house and on the street – a well-lit neighbourhood makes it difficult for burglars to get-away, deterring them from targeting the area. Make sure that the police verification of your hired help is done and that he/she is trustworthy.

While many of us take home security for granted, it’s important to be proactive to eliminate even the slight chance of a robbery. As the above videos show, robbers come up with ingenious ways to break in to homes. So, take their advice and invest in a good set of locks to protect your doors. Godrej Locks offer a range of innovative locks that are un-pickable and un-duplicable. To secure your house, see here.

The article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of Godrej Locks and not by the Scroll editorial team.